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Thread: Battery Issue

  1. #11

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    My battery died last year in my 2014 S3. I jump started it and drove to Audi and they said the battery had dropped a cell and they fitted a new one under warranty. I don't think you can leave the S3 switched on as it has a time out. I've sat in mine listening to the radio and an alert came on after 15 minutes or so warning me that the radio would be turning off, and the car shut itself down? If you can jump start it and drive it the alternator will charge it. If it holds a charge then yes it did run flat for some reason. If it won't charge, then the battery is defective. If its out of the car then put a battery charger on it. Put a volt meter on it and read the voltage, if it's reading zero volts then it may not recharge, but if it has 2 or more volts then it will recharge, but it may take a couple of days depending the charger. If it only charges to 10 volts then it's dropped a cell. Stand up to Audi, sounds like warranty to me.

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    Hey All, after a firm chat with the service department they agreed to have it replaced under warranty. Thanks for all the posts!

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
    MY17 S3 (Sportback, PP1, Assistance Pack, Panoramic Sun Roof, Mirror Pack, Daytona, 40:20:40 rear seats)

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to christianalexzappa For This Useful Post:

    umm (April 28th, 2017)

  4. Default

    My battery died last night in my MY15 2014 S3. i was able to jump start it but after i arrived home it didn't start up again, despite leaving the engine on for a while to try and charge it up. this morning i called Audi Roadside Assistance and they came by and replaced it with a Hankook SA57020 battery under warranty. Roadside assistance technician said there was a 3 year warranty on it so fingers crossed it lasts longer than the original battery (2 years and 8 months).

  5. #14

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    I have recently had some battery failures and they have all been Varta AGM style batteries. I bought them as they were stop / start technology and had a deeper reserve of power. Dropping a cell has been the common issue and not recoverable by various pulse or gassing charging methods. Meanwhile, a Varta Silver Calcium and an VW OE lead acid continue on regardless. I started with AGM batteries about 2000 with a Lifeline which also had this tendency so my current conclusions are that the AGM style, whilst it might provide certain power curve advantages, does not have the same life span. No idea why despite some professional involvement with industrial lead acid battery banks.
    B5 RS4 : Lightly modified -- C5 2.7 allroad -- B5 A4 1.8 quattro 132 Kw -- UNIMOG 404 TLF8

  6. #15

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    Battery University seems to think the reverse is true:
    AGM is making inroads into the start-stop function of cars. The classic flooded type is simply not robust enough and repeated cycling causes a sharp capacity fade after only two years of use. (See BU-806a: Heat, Loading and Battery Life.)
    However, maybe the answer is here:
    (Where is the battery mounted on a A/S3?)
    AGM and other sealed batteries do not like heat and should be installed away from the engine compartment. Manufacturers recommend halting charge if the battery core reaches 49C (120F).
    Might be an option for my S8/s where the battery is in the boot...

    Quotes from here:
    batteryuniversity.com
    Marty




    ---
    Current:
    2001 S8 - 19" x 9" C5 RS6 rims, Solar Sunroof, heated leather front and rear seats, tinted side and rear glass, RNS-D, XCarlink, Bose, clunky old phone in arm rest...
    2002 S8 - 18" RS4 reps (for now), Solar Sunroof, 'Sports' mode shifter... Engine dropped valve on PO - work in progress...

    Gone but not forgotten:
    ​1997 A4 Quattro V6 Manual "Hamilton's Club Sport"

  7. #16

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    Interesting comments if in the right context, no contest that AGM provides a better platform for heavy power drains encountered in stop / start technology at the automotive level. Whilst I purchased AGM technology a number of times, I don't have stop / start in the b5 platform. I did buy with an eye to the parasitic drain sometimes experienced when sitting for a week or so.That sort of thing can impact lead acid more than AGM. (Note, they are both lead acid, the AGM technology essentially places the electrolyte in suspension in a glass mat rather than free flowing in the general design).

    I have comparatively few starts followed by long periods of charge as most of my motoring is in the 100 - 1000 Km range. My experience is that under those conditions the lead acid sealed battery is performing within the normal performance parameters for between 6 and 8 years while the AGM under those conditions is less than 4 years. Any Battery manufacturer will tell you that 4 years is a great life, buy another. I wouldn't disagree except that the various styles of sealed lead acid were still performing strongly. Re your second point, true to some extent except the AGM and sealed lead acid batteries sat in the same battery cradle in the same car, one lives, one dies. Not the heat that does that.

    Industrial lead acid batteries have regulated charging routines to maximise the operational life. They have cooling systems, agitation systems to prevent stratification of the electrolyte, are gassed regularly and so on. The average car battery has very little management in the normal car, hostile environment, poorly regulated charging systems and so on. Surprise they last as long as they do. My point is that for me, using an advanced battery technology provides a financial loss compared with a top class sealed lead acid design and with no performance loss.
    B5 RS4 : Lightly modified -- C5 2.7 allroad -- B5 A4 1.8 quattro 132 Kw -- UNIMOG 404 TLF8

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